Bibliography: American Indians Rights (page 70 of 75)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Water Protectors . Info website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Paul Riede, John J. Fialka, Joe Muskrat, Ronald Roach, Gene Leitka, Hani Morgan, American Indian Journal, Southern Education Foundation, Susan Brooker-Gross, and Michelle J. Nealy.

Martinson, Tom, Ed.; Brooker-Gross, Susan, Ed. (1992). Revisiting the Americas: Teaching and Learning the Geography of the Western Hemisphere. Pathways in Geography Series, Title No. 4. This book, issued in observance of the Columbus Quincentennial and on the occasion of the 27th International Geographical Congress, addresses a broad range of contemporary topics including environmental change, dynamics of the world economy, human needs, wants and rights, political order and change, and contemporary cultures. The format is one of essays and complementary learning activities, including one essay and two activities in Spanish. Divided into five sections, section 1, "Environmental Change," contains the following essays: (1) "The Changing Use of Water in the Americas" (Lee); (2) "Streamflow" (Bock); (3) "The Effects of Volcanoes on the Landscapes and Peoples of the Americas" (Romey); (4) "Volcanoes and Human Activities in the Caribbean (Bencloski); (5) "The Global Effect of El Nino" (Caviedes); (6) "Teaching El Nino" (Prorok); (7) "Tropical and Temperate Rainforests" (Hansis); (8) "Humans, Owls, and Trees" (Beaman and Osborne); and (9) "Deforestation on Trial" (Sandmeier). Section 2, "World Economy," contains the following: (1) "United States Regions and the Global Economy" (Warf); (2) "Prisms of Promise–Selected Regions of the United States" (Marran); (3) "What is an 'American' Car? Global Interdependency in the Automotive Industry" (Rubinstein); (4) "The Automobile Worksheet" (Willman); (5) "Transportation and Urban Life" (Hodge); (6) "Planning a Light Rail System" (Speer); (7) "The Drug Industry in the Americas: The Andean Cocaine Connection" (Gerlach); (8) "Eradicating Coca" (S. Bednarz; R. Bednarz; and Walk) (9) "Editor's Note to Accompany 'A Planter's Day' by John G. Stedman" (Martinson); and (10) "Owning Slaves in Caribbean Colonial Plantation Culture" (Prorok). Section 3, "Human Needs and the Political Order," contains the following: (1) "Engendering the Discovery of the New World" (Momsen); (2) "Rural to Urban Migration in the Americas" (Whitsell); (3) "Regional Variation in Quality of Life in the Americas" (Greenow); (4) "Teaching the Quality of Life" (Crews); (5) "The Far South of the New World: South American Antarctica and the Southern Islands" (Child); (6) "The Development of Antarctica" (Sandmeier); (7) "Migration Trends in the Americas" (Conway); (8) "The Exponential Factor and Population Growth" (Pierson); (9) "The World in a Grain of Sand: Global Restructuring and Neighborhood Activism in Tucson, Arizona" (Marston); and (10) "Tucson Neighborhoods:" (Priest). Section 4, "Contemporary Cultures," lists the following: (1) "Reading the City Landscape as a Primary Document" (Salter); (2) "How to Read a City" (Salter); (3) "Steel Drums of Trinidad" (Dendinger); (4) "The Recipe for Steel Bands" (Willman); (5) "Geography of Religious Belief Systems" (Weightman); (6) "Scales of Religious Diversity" (Prorok); (7) "Women and Food in the Caribbean: A Study of St. Lucia" (Fredrich); and (8) "Do You Know Where Your Next Meal Is Coming From?" (Sharma). Section 5, "Voices from the South," contains: (1) "Ciudades Primadas y Regiones en la America Latina" (Elbow); (2) "Buenos Aires: Poblacion, Desarrollo y Futuro" (Barros); and (3) "Los Andes y el Regionalismo en el Ecuador" (Guillen). Contains a selected bibliography and a list of contributors.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian History, American Indians, Area Studies, Cross Cultural Studies

Canadian Journal of Native Education (1983). Cases of Discrimination against Native People and Settlements of These Cases: From the Files of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, 1978-1982. In connection with Ontario Ministry of Education high school curriculum guidelines on teaching about Native peoples, eight case studies of discrimination against Canada Natives, and court settlements of these cases, can be used with nine suggested learning activities to help students recognize the effects of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination. Descriptors: American Indians, Canada Natives, Case Studies, Court Litigation

Southern Education Foundation (2014). Just Learning: The Imperative to Transform Juvenile Justice Systems into Effective Educational Systems. A Study of Juvenile Justice Schools in the South and the Nation. Special Summary. This brief summarizes the findings of the larger study, "Just Learning: The Imperative to Transform Juvenile Justice Systems into Effective Educational Systems. A Study of Juvenile Justice Schools in the South and the Nation." With awareness growing that schools are disciplining and suspending minority students at alarming rates, the report provides powerful evidence that young people placed in the juvenile justice system–predominately minority males incarcerated for minor offenses–are receiving a substandard education. The report, "Just Learning: The Imperative to Transform Juvenile Justice Systems into Effective Educational Systems," argues that education for the 70,000 students in custody on any given day is setting them even further back in their ability to turn their lives around. Drawing upon the most recently available data from the nation's largest database on teaching and learning in juvenile justice systems, the report finds that the quality of the learning programs for incarcerated youth have had "little positive, enduring impact on the educational achievement of most children and youth in state custody." In 2009, for example, most "longer-term" students (those enrolled for 90 days or more) whose progress was documented failed to make any significant improvement in learning and academic achievement. Incarcerated youth in smaller facilities closer to their local communities actually made less progress than students enrolled in state systems. That was particularly true in the 15 Southern states, where the proportion of students enrolled in local facilities increased from 21 percent of all incarcerated students in 2007 to almost 60 percent in 2011. Part of the problem, the report says, is that the programs, which serve youth with serious learning and emotional problems, provide young people with limited supports. Taken as a whole, the report found that effects of juvenile justice programs are "profound and crippling," and set young people back when they should be turning lives around. However, it says that education in juvenile justice programs can be successful. It cites programs such as the Maya Angelou Academy in Washington, D.C., that use teaching and learning approaches that have proven to be effective for many high-risk students and in the general population. It also highlights research on an innovative educational program in Chicago demonstrating that cognitive behavior therapy resulted in a 44 percent reduction in violent crime arrests among participants during the program, as well as gains in schooling, measured by days in attendance, GPA, and school persistence. The report closes by describing a key strategy for creating positive turning points, potential economic gains from effective education, and by providing recommendations. [For the full report, see ED555854.]   [More]  Descriptors: Juvenile Justice, Minority Group Students, Disproportionate Representation, Institutionalized Persons

Muskrat, Joe (1972). Assimilate–or Starve!, Civil Rights Digest. Reviews two recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on Indian hunting and fishing, arguing that if Indians want to fish commercially they must join white society and fish according to the rules of that society.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Fisheries

Suitts, Steve; Dunn, Katherine; Sabree, Nasheed (2014). Just Learning: The Imperative to Transform Juvenile Justice Systems into Effective Educational Systems. A Study of Juvenile Justice Schools in the South and the Nation, Southern Education Foundation. With awareness growing that schools are disciplining and suspending minority students at alarming rates, the report provides powerful evidence that young people placed in the juvenile justice system-predominately minority males incarcerated for minor offenses-are receiving a substandard education. The report, "Just Learning: The Imperative to Transform Juvenile Justice Systems into Effective Educational Systems," argues that education for the 70,000 students in custody on any given day is setting them even further back in their ability to turn their lives around. Drawing upon the most recently available data from the nation's largest database on teaching and learning in juvenile justice systems, the report finds that the quality of the learning programs for incarcerated youth have had "little positive, enduring impact on the educational achievement of most children and youth in state custody." In 2009, for example, most "longer-term" students (those enrolled for 90 days or more) whose progress was documented failed to make any significant improvement in learning and academic achievement. Incarcerated youth in smaller facilities closer to their local communities actually made less progress than students enrolled in state systems. That was particularly true in the 15 Southern states, where the proportion of students enrolled in local facilities increased from 21 percent of all incarcerated students in 2007 to almost 60 percent in 2011. Part of the problem, the report says, is that the programs, which serve youth with serious learning and emotional problems, provide young people with limited supports. Taken as a whole, the report found that effects of juvenile justice programs are "profound and crippling," and set young people back when they should be turning lives around. However, it says that education in juvenile justice programs can be successful. It cites programs such as the Maya Angelou Academy in Washington, D.C., that use teaching and learning approaches that have proven to be effective for many high-risk students and in the general population. It also highlights research on an innovative educational program in Chicago demonstrating that cognitive behavior therapy resulted in a 44 percent reduction in violent crime arrests among participants during the program, as well as gains in schooling, measured by days in attendance, GPA, and school persistence. The report closes by describing a key strategy for creating positive turning points, potential economic gains from effective education, and by providing recommendations. The following are appended: (1) Youth in Residential Placement in Juvenile Justice Systems By Race, State, and Region: 2010; (2) A Void and Confusion of Data in Juvenile Justice Systems; (3) Calculations and Methodology; and (4) Measures of Academic Achievement-Neglected, Delinquent, and At-Risk Youth by State and Region: 2011. [Foreword by Kent McGuire. For the summary of this report, see ED555853.]   [More]  Descriptors: Juvenile Justice, Minority Group Students, Disproportionate Representation, Institutionalized Persons

Morgan, Hani (2009). Gender, Racial, and Ethnic Misrepresentation in Children's Books: A Comparative Look, Childhood Education. How children's books portray various groups is very important for educators to consider. In many literate cultures, values and attitudes are transmitted through storytelling, often involving the use of children's books. Young children usually enjoy having a book read to them. Unfortunately, children's literature traditionally has not been authentic in representing the experiences of many ethnic and racial minority groups. This comparative review of research discusses findings of selected studies concerning gender, racial, and ethnic misrepresentation in children's books. In addition, it offers suggestions for educators on how to deal with this concern.   [More]  Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Minority Groups, Racial Factors, Racial Bias

Riede, Paul (2001). More Than a Mascot, School Administrator. Describes how several school districts have coped with protracted and contentious community debate over the retirement of high school Native American team names and mascots, when Native American sensibilities clash with high school rituals and traditions. Offers tips on how to deal with the Native American mascot issue. Descriptors: American Indians, Civil Rights, Court Litigation, High Schools

Fialka, John J. (1978). The Indians, the Royalties, and the BIA: Billions in Coal and Uranium Could End Poverty, Civil Rights Digest. Discusses the relationship between Indians and the Bureau of Indian Affairs concerning coal and uranium supplies in three areas: Window Rock, Arizona; Crow, Montana; and Washington, D.C.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Economic Factors, Energy

Nealy, Michelle J.; Pluviose, David; Roach, Ronald (2008). 10 Diversity Champions II, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education. Introducing the "Champions of Diversity" in the Academic Kickoff issue proved a timely reminder of the mission of Diverse during the lead up to the 25th anniversary of Cox, Matthews and Associates, the founder of the former Black Issues in Higher Education and publisher of Diverse. In this edition, the editors at Diverse unveil its second slate of Champions, defining further the promise and vision committed organizations and individuals have put forth to bring about an inclusive U.S. society. By now, it's more than clear that Champions bring diversity and excellence together as harmonious and complementary values. It should also be clear that Champions deserve recognition for the transformative and vital work that they do.   [More]  Descriptors: Higher Education, Cultural Differences, American Indians, Civil Rights

Reyes, Augustina H. (2010). The Immigrant Children of Katrina, Peabody Journal of Education. In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina displaced the largest number of public school children ever affected by any disaster. Approximately 370,000 children, including 15,000 Latino/Hispanic children from Louisiana, were scattered throughout the 48 U.S. states (Landrieu, 2010; Louisiana Department of Education, 2004). Although much of the media attention, policy, and research have focused on the effects of race–primarily Black/White–in New Orleans disaster relief, Latino immigrant children were the silenced, invisible victims of the evacuation, policy, relief, and recovery services. The largely unreported immigrant evacuation from Louisiana was along a silent underground railroad of sorts, using a network of relatives and countrymen whenever they could (Plocek, 2006). The findings of this article illustrate the theoretical implications and consequences of identifying immigrant children as racially White. This study documents the intersections of local, state, and federal policy regarding schools and recovery relief showing that access to disaster relief and recovery were framed in context of immigration status often placing citizen children in at-risk conditions. Children have become the victims of anti-immigrant sentiment rising from the much symbolic and actual harassment that constitute the daily, shadow lives of the undocumented population.   [More]  Descriptors: Politics of Education, Immigrants, Immigration, At Risk Persons

American Indian Journal (1977). The Legal Status of Indians in Brazil.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Civil Rights, Foreign Countries, Governance

Payne, Diane (1979). A Brief History of Leonard Peltier vs. US: Is there Recourse for Justice?, American Indian Journal. Asserting the fact that Leonard Peltier is a contemporary element in a stream of Native American genocide, this article outlines the events and presents a picture of the abuses which precipitated a continuous 24 hour vigil at the U.S. Supreme Court.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Due Process

Leitka, Gene (1971). Search for Identity Creates Problems for Indian Students, Journal of American Indian Education. Descriptors: Activism, American Indians, Courts, Schools

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education (2010). Emerging Scholars: The Class of 2010. Every year, the Emerging Scholars edition features a diverse group of rising researchers, thinkers and leaders in various fields. Their credentials and accomplishments distinguish them, but it's the level of social consciousness among the members of this year's class that makes them truly excellent. Whether it's lending a hand to society's struggling Black men or training lawyers in Native American law, these scholars use their work to build upon the cornerstones of societal change. Their research represents the fruit of decades of diversity advocacy that has expanded the depth and breadth of knowledge in higher education. These scholars use their specializations to intercede on behalf of the nation's most vulnerable communities. As academicians, these scholars are stretching the limits of research, inquiry, technology and public policy to include all peoples while remaining faithful to unraveling the injustices of the society. This article introduces 12 emerging scholars for the class of 2010 and presents vignettes that applaud the work of these scholars. These scholars include: (1) Brendesha Tynes; (2) Shedra Amy Snipes; (3) Yaohang Li; (4) Luis Urrieta Jr.; (5) David Treuer; (6) Michael Dorsey; (7) Angelique EagleWoman; (8) Madhavi Sunder; (9) Erika Tatiana Camacho; (10) Gonzalo E. Torres; (11) Said Sewell III; and (12) Stephanie Y. Evans.   [More]  Descriptors: College Faculty, Researchers, Lawyers, Administrators

Wittstock, Laura Waterman (1973). The Bureau of Indian Affairs: Its Origins and Current Activities, Civil Rights Digest. Presents a context for such criticisms of the Bureau of Indian Affairs as: insufficient numbers of Indians in high positions; insensitivity toward Indians and their problems; mishandling of the funding of programs; inability or unwillingness to protect Indian interests; and, refusal to serve nonreservation Indians. Descriptors: Administrative Policy, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Civil Rights

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