Bibliography: Ecology (page 606 of 627)

This annotated bibliography is curated specifically for the Water Protectors . Info website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include TN. Nashville – Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, Lincoln. Great Plains National Instructional Television Library. Nebraska Univ, Everett T. Keach, Elmer D. Williams, W.C. VAN DEVENTER, Carl H. Rittenhouse, Myrtle Scott, Lakewood Jefferson County Public Schools, Margaret McDaniel, and Hollis W. Peter.

McDaniel, Margaret, Comp. (1974). Aids to Environmental Education: Preschool-Grade 3; Grades 4-6; Update I (June 1974). This annotated bibliography of environmental education materials for preschool through grade 6 is intended for teachers and librarians. Most materials cited were published from 1970-1972, although a few date from the 1960's. The bibliography has two main sections: (1) preschool-grade 3 and (2) grades 4-6. A third and last section, an update of materials published from 1970-1973, cites additional materials not included in the main section. Within each section materials are listed by author under the following categories: (1) bibliographies; (2) books for students; (3) books for teachers — activity guides; (4) curriculum materials; (5) filmstrips; (6) graphics; and (7) magazines. Prices are included for magazine subscriptions. Publisher's addresses are also provided.    [More]  Descriptors: Air Pollution, Annotated Bibliographies, Bibliographies, Conservation Education

VAN DEVENTER, W.C. (1967). MICHIGAN SCIENCE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PROJECT. (TITLE SUPPLIED). REPORTED ARE THE RESULTS OF A CURRICULUM RESEARCH PROJECT OF THE MICHIGAN SCIENCE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PROJECT FOR USE IN TEACHING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL UNIFIED SCIENCE. THE COMMITTEE USED PREVIOUS RESEARCH DATA, PARTICULARLY IN THE AREA OF INSTRUCTION AND INQUIRY TRAINING, TO DEVELOP 13 UNITS INCLUDING 55 OPEN-ENDED LABORATORY EXPERIENCES. EACH EXPERIENCE IS DIRECTED TOWARD ONE OR MORE OF 13 INTERDISCIPLINARY IDEAS WHICH ARE GROUPED UNDER TWO BASIC ASSUMPTIONS–(1) SCIENTISTS EXPECT NATURE TO BE DYNAMIC AND TO SHOW VARIATION AND CHANGE, (2) SCIENTISTS THINK OF THE WORLD, AND OF THE PHENOMENA IN IT, AS CONSISTING OF SETS OF RELATIONSHIPS RATHER THAN ABSOLUTES. EVALUATION WAS BASED ON STUDENTS' QUESTIONS SUBMITTED TO THE INSTRUCTOR AFTER THEY HAD COMPLETED INSTRUCTION RELATIVE TO A PARTICULAR IDEA. THESE QUESTIONS WERE THEN DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS, THOSE WHICH POINTED TOWARDS THE IDEA AND THOSE WHICH DID NOT. STUDENTS ALSO RESPONDED ON AN OBJECTIVE TEST WHICH REQUIRED THEM TO DISTINGUISH WHETHER A QUESTION DID OR DID NOT POINT TOWARD THE IDEA INVOLVED. FURTHER EVALUATION IS PROJECTED. THEY BELIEVE THAT THIS CAN BE USED, IN WHOLE OR IN PART, WITH ANY CURRICULUM PLAN SO LONG AS THE SUBJECT MATTER INCLUDED CAN BE MATCHED WITH ONE OR MORE OF THE IDEAS INCLUDED IN THE PROJECT MATERIALS. EACH OF THE 13 UNITS IS INCLUDED IN THE TEACHER'S GUIDE. CRITERIA FOR WRITING LABORATORY EXPERIENCES, SUGGESTED PROCEDURES FOR USING THE MATERIALS, AND THE TESTS DEVELOPED WITH THE PROJECT ARE ALSO INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Biology, Chemistry, Concept Teaching, Curriculum Development

Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Great Plains National Instructional Television Library. (1972). GPN Film Catalog 1972. The films described in this catalog were produced by schools or school-related organizations and were designed to meet the "relevant needs expressed by a broad spectrum of media personnel, students, and educators across the country." The catalog describes seventeen series and eight single films. For each of the series a description is presented delineating the overall aim of the series; in addition, a brief annotation for each of the films that make up the series is also given, along with information about its running time, rental/sales price, etc. The series cover a variety of topics. Of interest to teachers are such titles as "The American Community College,""Enrichment Programs for Intellectually Gifted Students," and "Success in Supervision." Series intended for high school students treat such topics as drug abuse, career planning, Black history, optics, and driver education. The single titles are generally designed to demonstrate the proper way to use television in schools. The catalog gives complete ordering information and also describes the conditions under which a single film of a series may be previewed.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Education, American History, Art, Black History

1976 (1976). Human Physiology and the Environment in Health and Disease: Readings from Scientific American. This anthology of articles is designed to supplement standard texts for courses in human physiology, environmental physiology, anatomy and physiology, pathobiology, general biology, and environmental medicine. It focuses on the influences of the external environment on the body, the physiological responses to environmental challenges, and the ways in which these responses contribute to either health or disease. The articles are organized into six sections, each preceded by a general introduction. The first four sections deal with the physiological effects of and responses to the nutritional, chemical, physical, and psychosocial environments. Next is a section discussing the immune defenses of the body, including responses to the microbial environment, reactions to cancer cells, and the problems of organ transplantation. The concluding section deals with the physiology of aging and brings together information and concepts from the earlier sections. The epilogue discusses the present evolution of man. Descriptors: Age, Biological Influences, Biology, Cytology

National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC. (1974). Teaching Resource Recovery in Industrial Arts. Resource Recovery Education Program. This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (See SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level industrial arts classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to understand that litter represents a small but highly visible portion of our municipal solid waste load; (2) to be aware of what happens to trash after it is hauled away; (3) to learn about improved methods for reducing waste volume and disposing of the residue; (4) to understand that through resource recovery we can utilize materials from solid waste. Teaching strategies include studies of the local community and having students prepare models, charts, diagrams, exhibits for local displays, research, and classroom discussion. The guide consists of five major study units: (1) Solid Waste: A Growing Problem; (2) Collection and Transportation; (3) Disposal; (4) Resource Recovery; and (5) Solid Waste Management Systems. Objectives, student activities, questions for discussion and research, basic understandings to be developed, and instructional resources are provided for each unit. A special projects section provides visual and print instructions for constructing a can crusher, a paper recycling system, a glass bottle cutter, and a magnetic separator.   [More]  Descriptors: Class Activities, Community Study, Conservation (Environment), Construction (Process)

Scott, Myrtle (1969). Some Parameters of Teacher Effectiveness as Assessed by an Ecological Approach, DARCEE Papers and Reports (George Peabody Coll. for Teachers). To identify parameters of teacher effectiveness, this study uses an ecological approach. Since setting, which includes not only physical surroundings but also the dynamic of activity, has a coercive effect on behavior, a teacher's ability to establish appropriate settings should be an accurate measure of effectiveness. Five head teachers in a project for disadvantaged 5-year-olds who were rated by supervisors at either extreme of effectiveness were selected for observation of their behavior. Complex, in-depth observations, based on behavioral episodes, were made of each teacher in the settings of "Morning Greeting" and "Large Group Activity." These observations were analyzed on a structural and quantitative basis involving 16 factors governing a behavioral episode. While the nature of the resulting data made statistical analysis inappropriate, several major trends were recorded. Those teachers rated effective maintained a smoother continuity to their activities, ended more episodes with the attainment of goals, and showed more positive and less negative emotions than their poorly rated counterparts. The effective teachers were more directly involved, more spontaneous, and more in control of situations.   [More]  Descriptors: Affective Behavior, Behavior Patterns, Behavioral Science Research, Classroom Environment

SHOMON, JOSEPH J. (1964). MANUAL OF OUTDOOR CONSERVATION EDUCATION. THE PURPOSE OF THIS BULLETIN IS TO PRESENT AND CLARIFY SELECTED CONCEPTS IN OUTDOOR CONSERVATION EDUCATION AND TO ORGANIZE GUIDELINES FOR DIRECTORS, TEACHERS, NATURALISTS, AND ADMINISTRATORS OF OUTDOOR FACILITIES TO ENABLE THEM TO USE THE OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENT AS AN EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM. THE OUTDOOR EDUCATION TOPICS INCLUDE (1) A PERSPECTIVE AND PHILOSOPHY, (2) THE REASONS FOR TEACHING OUTDOOR EDUCATION, (3) OBJECTIVES, (4) WHERE, WHAT, AND HOW TO TEACH, (5) EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES, AIDS, AND FEATURES, AND (6) ADMINISTRATION AND PROGRAMING. ALSO INCLUDED ARE A SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND A LIST OF THE MATERIALS AND SERVICES OFFERED BY THE NATURE CENTERS DIVISION OF THE NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY. THIS DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE FOR $2.00 FROM THE NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY, NATURE CENTERS DIVISION, 1130 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10028. Descriptors: Adult Education, Biology, College Science, Conservation Education

McDaniel, Margaret, Comp. (1974). Aids to Environmental Education: Grades 7-9, Grades 10-14, Update I (June 1974). This annotated bibliography of environmental education materials for grades 7 through 14 is intended for teachers and librarians. Most materials cited were published from 1970-1972, although a few date from the 1960's. The bibliography has two main sections: (1) grades 7-9 and (2) grades 10-14. A third and last section, an update of materials published from 1970-1973, cites additional materials not included in the main section. Within sections, materials are arranged by author within categories such as the following: (1) bibliographies; (2) books; (3) curriculum materials; (4) films; (5) filmstrips; (6) graphics; and (7) magazines and newsletters. Publisher's addresses are also provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Air Pollution, Annotated Bibliographies, Bibliographies, Conservation Education

Jefferson County Public Schools, Lakewood, CO. (1963). Outdoor Education Curriculum Guide, Grade 6. As developed for a 6th grade outdoor education program, this curriculum guide is organized around a common core designed to teach conservation and appreciation of natural resources. Program initiation, methods and procedures, information on natural resources, suggested time schedules, learning activities, nature hikes, and field trips are discussed to familiarize the teacher with the program. Maps, charts, and illustrations add detail to the narrative, explaining the outdoor laboratory school. Supporting programs in astronomy, art, health and safety, weather, recreation, and various work projects are designed to add enrichment to the basic core. Rules for students, letters to parents, materials and equipment lists, and various forms utilized are contained in the Appendix.    [More]  Descriptors: Art, Astronomy, Conservation Education, Core Curriculum

Rittenhouse, Carl H. (1970). Innovation Problems and Information Needs of Educational Practitioners. This study was planned to design, analyze, and field test procedures for identifying those operating problems of education practitioners which may be partially solved by making recent research developments available, and to identify the specific types of substantive and methodological information which the target audiences in elementary and secondary schools and in institutions of higher learning require to make decisions about education improvements. The primary method used was the mailed survey, with some interviews, and a second questionnaire was sent to a sample of the respondents to the first, asking them to list the specific types of information needed, indicate where they have been able to obtain it, and show how useful it had been in helping them to make a decision.  Results showed that the search for information is often disorganized. Larger school districts have generally adopted more innovations than smaller ones, and have better access to information, the preferred source being direct contact with personnel in other districts, supplemented by the extensive use of printed material, professional libraries, and information services. Clarity and conciseness are regarded as of primary importance. In higher education institutions special information is frequently obtained from institutions involved in similar changes, while some have set up long range planning and research activities.   [More]  Descriptors: Classes (Groups of Students), Differentiated Staffs, Dropouts, Ecology

State Univ. of New York, Plattsburgh. Coll. at Plattsburgh. (1972). Outdoor Education Activities for the School Curriculum, 1972. The basic resource materials in this document represent the cooperative efforts of graduate students enrolled in a 2-week field learning class at the State University of New York, Plattsburgh. These reports are an initial attempt to acquaint teachers with the many activities available to enrich the curriculum through the Outdoor Education Methods. Report titles are: Art in Nature; Health Education Through the Out of Doors; Language Arts in the Out Doors; Mathematics in the Out of Doors; Music in the Out of Doors; Outdoor Education for the Middle School Years; Physical Education in the Out of Doors; Sensory Awareness Through Outdoor Education; Learning Science in the Out of Doors, K-4; High School Science in the Out of Doors; School Site Utilization; Social Studies in the Out of Doors; and Water and Its Importance in the Ecological Systems of the World.   [More]  Descriptors: Art Activities, Curriculum Development, Ecology, Elementary Schools

Nashville – Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN. (1966). Outdoor Education Manual. Creative ways to use the outdoors as a part of the regular school curriculum are outlined in this teacher's manual for the elementary grades. Presented for consideration are the general objectives of outdoor education, suggestions for evaluating outdoor education experiences, and techniques for teaching outdoor education. The purpose and functions of a mobile unit–designed as a workshop, library, and laboratory to aid teachers–are discussed, and a list of equipment available on the unit (e.g., compasses, maps, and binoculars) is presented. The major portion of the manual lists outdoor education concepts by subject matter and grade level and suggests ways the concepts can be incorporated in the everyday curriculum.   [More]  Descriptors: Concept Teaching, Creative Teaching, Curriculum Enrichment, Ecology

Keach, Everett T., Jr.; Williams, Elmer D. (1973). Primary Environmental Education Project: Teacher's Guide and Modules 1, 2, and 3. The teacher's guide accompanies nine instructional modules on environmental education which are designed as supplementary material for a primary level social studies program. The modules focus on teaching/learning activities that will build on understanding of the interrelationships between man and the land, water, and air. A major objective is to have the students deal realistically with the environment. Emphasis is given to the thinking processes of young children and the provision for many opportunities to engage in creative thinking. Each instructional module (1) lists all required materials; (2) provides 10-15 learning experiences organized with a statement of content, required material, behavioral objectives, focusing questions, and overview; and (3) suggests supplementary experiences. The teacher's guide describes and illustrates teaching strategies based on three cognitive tasks–concept formation, interpretation of data, and application of principles–and on productive-divergent thinking behaviors. Additional suggestions for using the modules, a rationale for involving the community, and a final evaluation instrument are also included.   [More]  Descriptors: Administration, Cognitive Objectives, Concept Formation, Ecology

National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC. (1974). Teaching Resource Recovery in Social Studies. Resource Recovery Education Program. This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (see SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level social studies classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to explore the impact of our society on the problem of solid waste and the need for effective management; (2) to encourage student activities and involvement in environment conservation; (3) to examine technological developments which can reduce the problems and costs of refuse collection; and (4) to become aware of how local economic, political, and social problems are related to solid waste disposal and how local situations differ. Teaching strategies include having students conduct interviews, polls, and studies of the local community and classroom discussion. The guide consists of five major study units: (1) Solid Waste: A Growing Problem; (2) Collection and Transportation; (3) Disposal; (4) Resource Recovery; and (5) Solid Waste Management Systems. Objectives, student activities, questions for discussion and research, basic understandings to be developed, and instructional resources are provided for each unit.   [More]  Descriptors: Class Activities, Community Study, Conservation (Environment), Course Objectives

Peter, Hollis W.; And Others (1966). Comparative Theories of Social Change. This symposium report contains various statements of the theory of change and societal growth and maintenance viewed from the perspectives of major social disciplines. Comparative theories in these areas can provide guidelines for predicting, planning, and carrying out social development programs. The theme of the symposium was the problem of linking and reconciling the various theories within the context of an open general systems theory. The following papers are included: 1) Toward a General Theory of Directed Value Accumulation and Institutional Development, Harold D. Lasswell and Allan R. Holmberg; 2) Toward a Theory of Power and Political Structure, Karl W. Deutsch; 3) Wealth and the Economy, Everett E. Hagen; 4) Health and Well-Being Values in the Perspective of Sociocultural Change, Charles C. Hughes; 5) Social Change Skills and Creativity, Morris D. Stein; 6) Enlightenment and Communication, Daniel Lerner; 7) General Equilibrium Model of the Social System, Walter Isard and C. Peter Rydell; 8) Applying Behavioral Science for Organizational Change, Warren G. Bennis and Hollis W. Peter; 9) Institution Building in National Development, Milton J. Esman and Fred C. Bruhns. Each paper is discussed by the authors, discussants and observers. Includes a bibliography, glossary, and author biographies. Descriptors: Behavior Theories, Ecology, Economic Development, Environment

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