Bibliography: Ecology (page 609 of 627)

This annotated bibliography is curated specifically for the Water Protectors . Info website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include College Station. Sea Grant Coll. Program. Texas A and M Univ, Gerald R. Culen, Carole G. Basile, Teresa Mourad, Sarah A. Snyder, Kimi Hosoume, Michele Morrone, Bob Jickling, Donald B. Young, and Ruth A. Wilson.

Braus, Judy, Ed. (1987). Endangered Species: Wild & Rare, NatureScope. Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Endangered Species: Wild and Rare." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1) "The Big Picture," giving information and activities on the process of extinction, how the increasing human population affects other species, and the reasons for helping endangered species; (2) "The Habitat Connection," providing information and activities on the causes of habitat destruction and the effects of habitat loss on animals and plants; (3) "Poachers, Poisons and Other Problems," providing information and activities on factors other than habitat destruction such as wildlife trade, and pollution that are putting species in danger; (4) "Bouncing Back," describing information and activities on the ways in which people are helping endangered species; (5) "Crafty Corner," providing ideas for art projects; and (6) Appendix, featuring a glossary and reference information. Descriptors: Animals, Art Activities, Conservation (Environment), Ecology

Snyder, Sarah A. (1994). Energy, Atmosphere, and Climate. Teacher's Guide to World Resources. Comprehensive Coursework on the Global Environment. This teacher's guide presents teaching suggestions and presentation materials about how daily human activities, such as energy use, add pollutants to the atmosphere. The lesson is divided into seven parts and can be taught in two or more class periods. Student handouts include: (1) "Total Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1991"; (2) "Facts about Air Pollution"; (3) "Facts about Global Warming and Ozone Depletion"; and (4) "Reducing Carbon Emissions." Transparency masters are titled: (1) "Trends in Global Energy Consumption"; (2) "How the Greenhouse Effect Works"; (3) "Contributions to Global Warming"; (4) "Global Fossil Fuel Consumption, 1950-90"; (5) "Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations, 1860-1990"; (6) "The Greenhouse Index: 10 Countries with the Highest Greenhouse Gas Emissions, 1991″; (7)"Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, 1979-1991"; (8) "Number of Vehicles in the World"; and (9) "Energy Intensities in Developed Countries." Descriptors: Citizenship, Climate, Conservation (Environment), Developed Nations

Jickling, Bob, Ed. (1996). A Colloquium on Environment, Ethics, and Education (Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, July 14-16, 1995). The papers in this proceedings explore two themes: "what environmental ethics can do for teachers," and "what teachers can do for environmental ethics." The papers are: "A Colloquium on Environment, Ethics, and Education: Considering the Context" (Bob Jickling); "Planning for the Future: Workshop Observations and Recommendations" (Colloquium Participants); "Welcoming Remarks" (Shirley Adamson, et. al.); "Transferring Wisdom through Storytelling" (Louise Profeit-LeBlanc); "The Role of Socially Evolved Ideals in Environmental Ethics Education in Canada and the Yukon: A Historical Approach Involving the Humanities" (Eugene C. Hargrove); "What Is a Good Way To Teach Children and Young Adults To Respect the Land? (A Panel Discussion)" (Lucy Wren et. al.); "Relational Modes of Knowing: Learning Process Implications of a Humane and Environmental Ethic" (David Selby); "Sacred Land" (Jim Cheney); "An Unwanted Story" (Martha McMahon); "Environmental Education, Liberatory Education and Place-Sensitive Narrative" (Val Plumwood); "The Role of the University, Scientists, and Educators in Promotion of Environmental Literacy" (John Lemons); "Professionalization and Environmental Education: Are We Guarding against Charlatans or Losing the Passion?" (Marilyn MacDonald); "Environmental Education as Values Education: A Critical Framework" (Pamela Courtenay Hall); "Instead of Environmental Education" (Anthony Weston); "Wolves, Ethics, and Education: Looking at Ethics and Education through the Yukon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan" (Bob Jickling); and "Directions for the Future: Environmental Education in British Columbia" (Rick Kool).   [More]  Descriptors: Conservation (Environment), Ecology, Economic Research, Elementary Secondary Education

Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Sea Grant Coll. Program. (1997). Marine Education: A Bibliography of Educational Materials Available from the Nation's Sea Grant College Programs. Fifth Edition. This bibliography features a compilation of textbooks, curricular materials, and other marine education resource materials developed by individual Sea Grant programs throughout the Unites States. The listing is intended to be used as a tool for teachers and other individuals interested in helping students explore and understand our oceans and Great Lakes. Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Biology, Conservation (Environment), Earth Science

Snyder, Sarah A. (1994). Biodiversity. Teacher's Guide to World Resources. Comprehensive Coursework on the Global Environment. This teacher's guide presents teaching suggestions and presentation materials about the importance of biodiversity, examines why it is threatened, and suggests ways of conserving it. The lesson is divided into seven parts and suggests allowing two or more class periods for completion. Student handouts include: (1) "Test Yourself: How Much Do You Know about Biodiversity?"; (2) "Facts about Biodiversity"; (3) "Collecting Species Data in Costa Rica"; and (4) "Answers to 'How Much Do You Know about Biodiversity?'" Transparency masters are titled: (1) "Species Remaining to be Described"; (2) "Wetland Loss in Selected Industrialized Countries, 1950-80"; (3) "Trends in Deforestation and Population Growth, 1850-1980"; and (4) "Tropical Areas with Rich Floral Diversity." Descriptors: Biodiversity, Citizenship, Conservation (Environment), Developing Nations

Basile, Carole G.; And Others (1997). Nature at Your Doorstep: Real World Investigation for Primary Students. "Nature at Your Doorstep" is an outgrowth of a successful environmental education program offered as a school field trip at a Nature Discovery Center. It was developed and used with thousands of students throughout Bellaire, Texas and the surrounding Houston metroplex. The purpose of this program is to kindle students' curiosity and wonder about the interdependent world of nature of which they are a part, and to foster their responsibility toward the environment. Each unit is designed to guide students through discovery of basic biological concepts using the scientific method as a logical method of inquiry. Students explore questions, formulate hypotheses based on current knowledge, collect data relevant to the questions, and, by creating various forms of representations, analyze their data to formulate conclusions and compare those conclusions with their hypotheses. The 10 units are as follows: (1) Senses; (2) Trees; (3) Birds; (4) Insects and Neighbors; (5) Ants; (6) Biodiversity; (7) Habitats; (8) Communities; (9) Food Webs; and (10) Endangered Species. Each unit provides focus and background material, activities to introduce the topic, suggestions for teaching each data sheet, and extensions for further study. Student data sheet masters are included. All units are integrated with opportunities for learning experiences in science, mathematics, and language arts. Descriptors: Biological Sciences, Ecology, Environmental Education, Ethics

Mourad, Teresa; Morrone, Michele (1997). Directory of Ohio Environmental Education Sites and Resources. This publication is the result of a collaboration between the Environmental Education Council of Ohio (EECO) and the Office of Environmental Education at the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). This directory of environmental education resources within the state of Ohio is intended to assist educators in finding information that can complement local curricula and programs. The directory is divided into three sections. Section I contains information on local environmental education sites and resources. These are grouped by EECO region, alphabetized by county, and further alphabetized by organization name. Resources range from arboretums to zoos. Section II lists resources available at a statewide level. These include state and federal government agencies, environmental education organizations and programs, and resource persons. Section III contains cross-referenced lists of Section I by organization name, audience, organization type, and programs and services to help educators identify local resources. Guidelines for educators to getting the most out of available but scarce resources and guidelines for resource professionals to achieving the greatest possible impact are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Agencies, Conservation Education, Curriculum Enrichment, Ecology

Braus, Judy, Ed. (1992). Diving into Oceans, NatureScope. Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Diving Into Oceans." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1) "The Physical Ocean," giving information and activities on the physical properties of the ocean including the composition of seawater, waves, currents, and tides, and the topography of the ocean floor; (2) "Life in the Ocean," providing information and activities on what life is like in three major regions of the ocean–sunlit surface waters, dim mid-waters, and dark ocean depths; (3) "Along the Coast and Close to Shore," giving information and activities on the characteristics of beaches, rocky shores, coral reefs, and kelp forests, and the plants and animals that live in these habitats; (4) "People and Oceans," providing information and activities on people's relationship with oceans, focusing on ocean pollution, how people use oceans, and what's being done to protect the sea and its wildlife; (5) "Crafty Corner," providing ideas for art projects; and (6) "Appendix," featuring a glossary and bibliographic information. Descriptors: Animals, Art Activities, Biological Sciences, Conservation (Environment)

Culen, Gerald R. (1994). The Effects of an Extended Case Study on Environmental Behavior and Associated Variables in Seventh and Eighth Grade Students. This paper summarizes a study that assessed the effects of an extended case study that focused on wetland issues with seventh and eighth grade students. The extended case study is an instructional methodology that incorporates the issue investigation/evaluation and action training model. A modified pretest-posttest nonequivalent control group design was utilized with fifteen intact classes from Illinois and Missouri. Posttest data were collected on the variables of overt environmental behavior, knowledge of ecological foundations, individual locus of control, group locus of control, knowledge of citizenship action skills, and perceived skill in the use of citizenship action skills. Analysis of covariance was used to compare treatment groups and control group means. Statistically significant differences were found with the variable overt environmental behavior. The two experimental treatments were found to be more effective than the control, and the full treatment was found to be more effective then the partial treatment in increasing overt environmental behavior.   [More]  Descriptors: Analysis of Covariance, Case Studies, Control Groups, Ecology

Wilson, Ruth A. (1995). Natural Beginnings: A Teacher Training Model for Early Childhood Educators. This paper presents a description of Natural Beginnings, an early childhood environmental education teacher inservice workshop. The purpose, content, and format of the workshop are discussed, as are evaluation results. Evaluation results indicate that the workshop was highly effective in increasing teachers' confidence in infusing environmental education into an early childhood curriculum, fostering teachers' own understanding and appreciation of the natural environment, introducing teachers to environmental education materials and other resources in the community, and fostering partnerships between early childhood educators and environmental education resource professionals. One unique feature of the workshop was the development and field-testing of new environmental education materials (i.e., activity kits and instructional units) appropriate for the early childhood level. In addition to evaluating the effectiveness of the workshop, participant feedback was also used to develop recommendations for similar workshops in the future. Additional benefits resulting from the workshop include increasing parents' and colleagues' interest and involvement in environmental education activities.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Class Activities, Classroom Environment, Community Programs

Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC. (1996). Education for Sustainability: An Agenda for Action. Understanding the principles of sustainability and the interdependence of the environment, the economy, and social systems can help individuals learn to make the changes necessary to become effective stewards of natural resources and the environment. This document describes three broad policy recommendations as to how Americans can build concepts of sustainability into educational programs, and 12 strategic action plans for implementing those recommendations. The recommendations provide a framework for a flexible strategy and a toolbox of ideas which can be tailored to educational strategies reflective of individual and community needs. Chapters are as follows: (1) "A Program for Change"; (2) "Formal Education"; (3) "Nonformal Education"; (4) "Cross-Cutting Themes"; and (5)"Moving Forward." Core themes of the program include lifelong learning, interdisciplinary approaches, systems thinking, partnerships, multicultural perspectives, and empowerment. A key feature of the agenda is the Opportunities for Partnerships section at the conclusion of each chapter, which provides names, organizations, and resources to guide future steps. A sampling of programs and successful initiatives is presented to illustrate successful cooperative efforts and partnerships.   [More]  Descriptors: Action Research, Conservation Education, Ecology, Educational Change

Taragan, Barbara (1989). [Enter the World of the Naturalist.] Nature. Teacher's Guide. This curriculum guide was developed for use with public television's Nature series. The materials in the guide are designed to help students actively participate in the study and experience of nature. Students are encouraged to view the programs as naturalists would, observing animals in their environment, noting their behavior, and drawing conclusions. Each lesson in the Teacher's Resource Guide includes: (1) a "Program Overview" that presents background information and brief synopses of the program to be viewed; (2) "Objectives" that provide the teacher with measurement goals; (3) a "Before Viewing Activity" that familiarizes students with the subject and allows them to set purposes for viewing; (4) "Vocabulary" that features definitions of unfamiliar words used in each program; (5) "Discussion Questions" that help students assess the main points of the program; (6) "Suggested Reading" for students who may want to learn more about the topic; and (7) a "Naturalist's Guide" (student worksheet) to be duplicated and distributed to students. The programs highlighted in this guide focus on animal family groupings, exploring the various ways they bear and raise young and share tasks and responsibilities such as hunting and protection. Program titles include "Kali the Lion,""Year of the Jackal,""The Frozen Ocean,""The Land of Beyond," and "The Young Ones."   [More]  Descriptors: Animal Behavior, Animals, Development, Ecological Factors

Young, Donald B.; Pottenger, Francis M. (1992). Water Resource Management. [Student Guide] and Teacher's Guide. This student guide and accompanying teacher's guide are a product of the Foundational Approaches in Science Teaching (FAST) curriculum development project at the University of Hawaii. In the teaching guide, the introduction gives a description of the underlying theory and practice in FAST and includes the FAST instructional model, descriptions of FAST courses, a conceptual framework of the local environment, a schedule and sequence of the units, a description of FAST instructional materials, and a safety advisory. Both the student and teacher guides are made up of eight investigations separated into three sections. In Section A, "Water in My Community," students investigate the water cycle, uses of water, the distribution of water, and local resources related to water resource management. In Section B, "Monitoring Water Quality," students investigate testing water quality, purifying water, and managing water resources. In Section C, "Making Decisions," students simulate the planning of a community in which the dominant feature of the area is a marsh. In the teacher's guide, each investigation includes the following sections: review, introduction of new work, student activities, summary, challenge, rationale, overview, materials, and notes. In the student guide, each investigation may contain the following sections: background information, activity, materials, procedure, summary, and challenge. Concluding the teacher's guide are visual aid and student record book masters. Descriptors: Community Problems, Ecology, Environmental Education, Groundwater

Jones, Teri Crawford; Taragan, Barbara (1993). Land of the Eagle. Nature. Teacher's Guide. This curriculum guide was developed for use with public television's Nature series. The materials in the guide are designed to help students actively participate in the study and experience of nature. Students are encouraged to view the programs as naturalists would, observing animals in their habitats, noting their behavior, examining the environmental, economic, and political factors that affect their condition, and drawing conclusions. Each lesson in the Teacher's Resource Guide includes: (1) a "Program Overview" that presents background information and brief synopses of the program to be viewed; (2) "Before Viewing the Program" that familiarizes students with the program's subject and allows them to set purposes for viewing; and (3) "After Viewing the Program" that provides discussion questions to help students assess the main points of the program. Some lessons also contain: (i) "Objectives" that provide the teacher with measurement goals; (ii) "Vocabulary" that features definitions of unfamiliar words used in each program; and (iii) a "Naturalist's Guide" (student worksheet) to be duplicated and distributed to students. The programs highlighted in this guide examine the natural history of North America. Program titles include "The Great Encounter,""Conquering the Swamps,""Across the Sea of Grass,""The First and Last Frontier,""Confronting the Wilderness,""Into the Shining Mountains,""Living on the Edge," and "Searching for Paradise." (Contains 41 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Earth Science, Ecological Factors, Ecology, Elementary Secondary Education

Echols, Jean C.; Hosoume, Kimi; Kopp, Jaine (1997). Eggs Eggs Everywhere. Teacher's Guide. Preschool-1. LHS GEMS. This book supports the National Science Education Standards by giving children an understanding of the characteristics of organisms, outlining the life cycles of organisms, and showing how organisms relate to their environments. Interweaving life science with literature, mathematics, and physical sciences, the unit begins with children participating in "The Chicken Drama," an activity which includes role playing chicks hatching out of eggs. In Activity 2, students begin with Ruth Heller's illustrated book, "Chickens Aren't the Only Ones," for a broad picture of the many animals that hatch from eggs. Students role-play the different animals that hatch from eggs and organize and compare animals by number of legs. As students sort, classify, and graph, they use logical thinking skills to organize data, use numbers in context, and make comparisons. Children also investigate animals that lay their eggs on land and in water. In Activity 3, students get acquainted with a live box turtle by observing, touching, and feeding it. They learn how turtles, fish, and snakes lay eggs, how the eggs hatch, and how the animals live in their environments. Activity 4 has children exploring the movement of plastic eggs and other objects on flat and inclined surfaces. Descriptors: Activity Units, Animals, Biological Sciences, Class Activities

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