Bibliography: Ecology (page 626 of 627)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized for the Water Protectors . Info website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Berkeley. Lawrence Hall of Science. California Univ, Kgomotso Mogome-Ntsatsi, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch. Alberta Dept. of Education, Department of the Interior Bureau of Education, Columbus ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science Education, Ted Trainer, Elissa C. Lichtenstein, Alison Wood, N. Dorofeeva, and Kay Fairwell.

Trainer, Ted (1990). Re-thinking Sustainable Development, Geographical Education. Discusses the overconsumption and overproduction of industrialized nations and the condition of developing nations. Considers the global revolution in institutions, systems, values, and lifestyles necessary to implement sustainable development. Depicts a world of decentralized, self-sufficient communities, and describes education's potential role in achieving and perpetuating that society. Descriptors: Change Strategies, Consciousness Raising, Conservation (Environment), Decentralization

Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior (1925). Cycles of Garden Life and Plant Life: A Series of Projects in Nature Study for Elementary Schools. Bulletin, 1925, No. 15. The Bureau of Education developed this course of study, published as a bulletin, reflecting increased interest of the movement for out-door education and in response to a request to the Bureau from the General Federation of Women's Clubs. It will be of value in promoting a type of study much needed in schools, and it will offer to the primary and intermediate teacher a suggestive series of projects on nature study which can be easily adapted to the daily programs in schools in different localities in the United States. This course is a detailed plan of work covering the child's ordinary range of experience and environment, including cycles of garden life and plant life. It is designed for all grades and is divided into two separate units of lower and upper grade work, the teachers in each grade to select the material best adapted to their courses of study and their daily programs. Correlation of nature study with the other subject matter in use in the schools is the principle worked out in this plan of work based on the child's environment. All the activities of the school are included in it, and suggestions for the use of nature study as an integral part of the other lessons are given in the daily program. Lessons in reading, language, and arithmetic are suggested; appropriate songs and stories are indicated; and bases for the arts and crafts and language modes are given. This bulletin contains a series of projects in nature study, which are planned with special reference to the appropriate seasons of the year and to the needs and conditions of the grade teachers in the schools. These lessons are so arranged that they may be adapted to the teacher's use without necessitating an undue amount of research and study. Subjects are listed, references are given, and outlines provided for each subject. In addition to this a suggestive lesson which has been worked out in a schoolroom is presented with each subject to further aid the teacher in adapting the work for her use. Suggestions for handwork, for field trips, and for simple experiments in the schoolroom will clear away the difficulties of many teachers who are trying to work out a project in nature study. (Contains 4 footnotes and 6 figures.) [Best copy available has been provided.] Descriptors: Field Trips, Botany, Plants (Botany), Gardening

Fairwell, Kay, Ed.; And Others (1977). Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition. Set III. The predominant focus of the 24 Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set III activities is on animal behavior, and the adaptations and diversity of both plants and animals. Night time activities, games, investigation, experimentation, and crafts are used to study ants, birds, clams, water snails, water striders, spiders, lizards, pillbugs, sow bugs, jays, and plants. The holding adaptations of water organisms, response of animals to varying light conditions, stalking, food preferences, and pigmentation are also investigated. The activities, organized in 24 separate, water-resistant folios, include introduction, preparation, materials, actions, follow up, and related activities. There are 3 additional folios. An "OBIS Tool Box" provides information for construction and use of simple equipment, such as a clam hoop, lizard rig, night shine flashlight, and sweep net, and explains game variations and craft methods. There is an order form for hard-to-locate materials. A "Survival Kit" for leaders contains sample combinations of activities from Sets I, II, and III to organize concept packages and skill units, as well as tips on safety, conservation, and site selection. "What is OBIS?" explains some major biological and environmental concepts embraced by the activities.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Adjustment (to Environment), Animal Behavior, Biology

Huckle, John (1990). "What We Consume": The Curriculum Rationale, Geographical Education. Introduces "What We Consume," a British curriculum package that examines the social use of nature, world economy, and environmental/political controversies. Explains that the package's goal is to develop students' critical awareness of environmental problems and willingness to initiate change. Outlines the curriculum's framework and identifies insights drawn from other packages covering political education and world studies. Descriptors: Conservation (Environment), Controversial Issues (Course Content), Critical Theory, Critical Thinking

Wood, Alison; And Others (1996). Environmental Education in Suffolk, Environmental Education. Describes many environmental education projects conducted in schools in Suffolk County, England. Projects include One World Week, which prepared students for exchange visits with Kenya by encouraging awareness of world problems, especially those of poverty and distribution of resources. Other projects were comprised of outdoor programs, recycling programs, school grounds projects, environmental play production, farm visits, special needs programs, and inservice teacher education. Descriptors: Conservation (Environment), Disabilities, Drama, Ecology

Dorofeeva, N.; And Others (1987). Content of General Education in Programmes of Agricultural Technical and Vocational Institutions. Ukranian SSR. Studies in Technical and Vocational Education 26. Perhaps the main objective of vocational-technical education in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic today is to train middle-level managers and agricultural workers to take part in the republic's comprehensive program to accelerate its social and economic development. Secondary agricultural institutions called sovkhoz-technicums have played an important role in upgrading the quality of training provided to specialists in agriculture. Students being trained as agricultural specialists are also given training in general subjects and especially in biology. Ecological education and an interdisciplinary approach are also at the center of the movement to improve vocational-technical education. Active teaching methods, including problem solving, brainstorming, computer-assisted instruction, olympiads, and group and individual tutorials, coupled with increased use of audiovisual teaching aids, are being encouraged. Since 1987, teachers of general subjects at technical schools have had to improve their professional skills at regional advanced teacher training institutes. Efforts are under way to create a unified system of general secondary education throughout the republic and establish a closer relationship between general secondary and vocational education. Descriptors: Agricultural Education, Case Studies, Curriculum, Ecology

Whitney, Helen, Comp. (1975). 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 4–Science Activities. Fourth in the series "101 Environmental Education Activities" by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center, the booklet contains 39 environment-based science activities directed to students in primary, intermediate, and junior high classes. Organization of the activities usually includes grade level, objectives, procedures, and materials, evaluation criteria, and sometimes includes hints and follow-up activities as well. In general, emphasis is placed on learning about soils; weather; various life forms; ecological and environmental relationships; conservation; natural phenomena; and on enhancing the students' powers of observation, sensory awareness, and awareness of environmental problems. Activities include science and energy surveys, weather observations and predictions, soil study and analysis, tree study, plant and animal observations, and specimen collection. Field trips to forest, timber, marsh, and river areas, as well as new housing developments and waste disposal plants help students examine many aspects of their environment from the point of view of various sciences. Descriptors: Climate, Conservation (Environment), Curriculum Enrichment, Curriculum Guides

ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science Education, Columbus, OH. (1968). SCIENCE EDUCATION INFORMATION ANALYSIS CENTER NEWSLETTER. THE PRINCIPAL FOCUS OF THIS NEWSLETTER IS PROVIDING A DIRECTORY OF OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES. THE INFORMATION IS DIRECTED AT SCHOOLS OR ORGANIZATIONS PLANNING TO DEVELOP SUCH PROGRAMS. THE ENTRIES ARE LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY STATE. EACH ENTRY CONTAINS (1) THE NAME OF THE PERSON TO CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, (2) THE ADDRESS OF THE PROJECT, AND (3) A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF EACH PROJECT. ALSO PROVIDED ARE INFORMATION ON (1) THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION PUBLICATION "RESEARCH IN EDUCATION" (RIE), AND (2) THE ERIC DOCUMENT REPRODUCTION SERVICE. THIS DOCUMENT IS ALSO AVAILABLE FROM THE ERIC INFORMATION ANALYSIS CENTER FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION, 1460 WEST LANE AVENUE, COLUMBUS, OHIO 43221.   [More]  Descriptors: Art, Biological Sciences, Conservation Education, Curriculum Development

Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch. (1991). Junior High Environmental and Outdoor Education: Teacher. This manual for Junior High Environmental and Outdoor Education courses specifically addresses the special needs of adolescent students. A program development model is organized around six elements: (1) outdoor core; (2) personal and group development; (3) environmental core; (4) outdoor expeditions; (5) environmental investigations; and (6) commitment to action. These elements, designed to be taught either as a single course or as a sequence program of up to 3 years, are integrated to develop three strands: outdoor, personal and group development, and environmental. These strands, in turn, are developed over three levels of experience: a foundation level, an exploration level, and an empowerment level. The manual is divided into eight chapters and an appendix that contains Alberta Education's policy on controversial issues and supplementary information sources. Chapter 1 introduces the course rationale, philosophy and the development process of general learner expectations, course organization, and planning considerations. Chapters 2 and 3 include content and development outlines and a compilation of pertinent resources. Chapter 4 provides guidelines for single- and multi-year program development. Chapters 5 and 6 provide model units for introductory, intermediate and advanced level units. The last two chapters concern safety considerations and evaluation techniques. The course is designed to shift from teacher-directed learning to teacher-facilitated activities and student-initiated action. Community involvement is encouraged and guidelines for utilizing resource people for group presentations is provided. Descriptors: Adolescents, Course Content, Course Descriptions, Course Evaluation

Mogome-Ntsatsi, Kgomotso; Adeola, O. A. (1995). Promoting Environmental Awareness in Botswana: The Role of Community Education, Environmentalist. Highlights environmental problems confronting Botswana and describes the role of government, through National Conservation Strategy, in possible solutions. Also examines nongovernmental organizations which are involved in natural resource conservation and provide avenues for discussion of the environment and natural resources to increase public awareness. Discusses the role of community education. Contains 21 references. Descriptors: Change Strategies, Conservation Education, Development, Drought

INGERSOLL, JONATHAN E.; AND OTHERS (1967). THE 1967 SUMMER SCIENCE PROJECT AT UNIVERSITY SCHOOL. DESCRIBED IS A SIX-WEEK SUMMER SCIENCE PROJECT DESIGNED TO–(1) PROVIDE TALENTED TEACHERS AND PROMISING STUDENTS FROM DIVERSE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUNDS WITH THE OPPORTUNITY TO TEACH AND LEARN TOGETHER IN CIRCUMSTANCES CONDUCIVE TO CREATIVE ENDEAVOR AND MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING, (2) CONTRIBUTE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMING IN THE NATURAL SCIENCES, (3) MAINTAIN AND EXTEND THE COOPERATIVE ENDEAVORS OF CLEVELAND'S MAJOR CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES, AND (4) INTRODUCE URBAN AND SUBURBAN BOYS TO THE NATURAL EARTH. THE PROJECT INVOLVED 72 JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL BOYS FROM 21 CLEVELAND URBAN SCHOOLS, 10 SUBURBAN SCHOOLS, AND TWO INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS. LOCAL TEACHERS AND PERSONNEL FROM THE CLEVELAND NATURAL SCIENCE MUSEUM, OHIO UNIVERSITY, AND OTHER COMMUNITY AGENCIES WERE INVOLVED IN CONDUCTING THE PROJECT. A PROJECT RATIONALE AND DESCRIPTION ARE PROVIDED. THE DESCRIPTION IS DIVIDED INTO THE SIX WEEKS COVERED AND INCLUDES FOR EACH WEEK–(1) TOPIC COVERED, (2) CLASSROOM AND FIELD ACTIVITIES, AND (3) RESOURCES WHICH INCLUDE REFERENCES, FILMS, EQUIPMENT, AND PERSONNEL. NUMEROUS PICTURES OF STUDENT INVOLVEMENT ARE INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Biology, Community Resources, Conservation Education

Fairwell, Kay, Ed.; And Others (1975). Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition. Set I. The Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set I contains 24 varied activities which make use of crafts, simulations, and basic investigative techniques to provide introductory learning experiences in outdoor biology for children aged 10 to 15. The individual water-resistant folio for each activity includes biological definitions and concepts, materials list, preparation, action, discussion, follow up, and suggested subsequent activities. Among the activities are studies of animal movement in water, leaves, natural recycling in soil and in water, seed dispersal, ponds, natural camouflage, and predator devices. Making sun prints, mapping a study site, plant hunts, and introductory census activities are also included. Set I includes 3 introductory folios."What is OBIS?" explains the project's governing concepts and goals. The "Leader's Survival Kit" notes good activity sites, sample activity sequences, and safety information. An "OBIS Tool Box" contains Equipment and Technique Cards giving instructions for building and using various inexpensive equipment such as plankton nets and weed grapples. Instructions for each device are complete on one card. Finally, there are 2 booklets, a Pond Guide and a Lawn Guide, designed for quick and easy identification, via pictures, written descriptions, and size scales, of the most commonly encountered organisms in those locations.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Animal Behavior, Biology, Construction (Process)

California Univ., Berkeley. Lawrence Hall of Science. (1978). Actividades al Aire Libre (Outdoor Activities). OBIS/Mini-Corps. Prepared specifically for use in one-week outdoor summer camp programs for migrant children aged 10-15, the twenty bilingual (Spanish and English) educational and recreational activities in the Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS)/Mini-Corps package have been revised to develop language skills as well as an awareness of the outdoor environment. Simulation, observation, experimentation, and numerous games are used to study ants, fish, lichen, plant habitats and distribution, decomposers, water organisms, stalking, and food chains. Each activity is presented in an individual water-resistant folio containing an introduction, materials list, preparation, action, and language development section consisting of discussion activities, language games, and an all-Spanish mini-dictionary. Throughout the package instructions and information for the leader are in English. Headings, key words, materials, and instructions for students are bilingual. The package contains three additional folios which explain fundamental OBIS activity concepts, describe how to use the materials and activities, and give directions for the construction of simple equipment such as dip nets and aquatic observation chambers. Two booklets aid identification of organisms found in and around lawns and ponds. A Spanish version of the same package is also available. Descriptors: Activity Units, Bilingual Education, Biology, Day Camp Programs

Lichtenstein, Elissa C. (1997). The Environment: The Tie That Binds, Update on Law-Related Education. Articulates the need for international cooperation concerning environmental issues and the promotion of sustainable development. Discusses several international treaties and conventions addressing specific environmental concerns. Lists a number of worldwide environmental concerns, including fresh water, arable land, air pollution, oceans, forests, and biodiversity. Descriptors: Civics, Current Events, Developing Nations, Ecology

California Univ., Berkeley. Lawrence Hall of Science. (1978). Actividades al Aire Libre (Outdoor Activities). OBIS/Mini-Corps. The all-Spanish version of the Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS)/Mini-Corps Outdoor Activities set contains twenty education and recreational activities which provide a variety of outdoor biological experiences and incorporate language skills into outdoor education. Prepared especially for use by migrant children aged 10-15 in a summer camp environment, the activities employ educational games, experimentation, observation, and simulation in the study of plant and animal organisms on land and in the water. Each activity is presented in an individual water-resistant folio, complete with introduction, materials list, preparation, action, and language development section. Presented in three parts (discussion, games, vocabulary) the language section is designed to take advantage of the language possibilities that arise naturally from each activity. The package contains three additional folios which explain fundamental OBIS activity concepts, describe how to use the materials and activities, and give directions for the construction of simple equipment such as dip nets and aquatic observation chambers. A bilingual version of the same package is also available.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Biology, Day Camp Programs, Ecology

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