Bibliography: Climate Change (page 466 of 472)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Water Protectors . Info website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Donald R. Wentworth, Meg A. Bond, Jean L. Pyle, W. Alan Wright, John D. Donahue, Lisa M. Lynch, Ann E. Austin, Phillip Cagan, Indermit S. Gill, and Mark C. Schug.

Schug, Mark C.; Morton, John S.; Wentworth, Donald R. (1997). Economics and the Environment – EcoDetectives. EconomicsAmerica. This book helps middle school and high school students address environmental issues in an intelligent and productive manner. The lessons introduce economic reasoning and show students how to apply it to environmental problems. The 18 lessons are divided into four units addressing: the environment and the economy; incentives; use of market forces to improve the environment; and public choice theory and the environmental movement. Lesson titles include: (1) "The Problem of the Homeless Salmon"; (2) "Romancing the Past"; (3) "Own It or Lose It"; (4) "The Environment: Who Loves Ya, Baby?"; (5) "How Clean Is Clean Enough?"; (6) "How Can We Help the Endangered Species?"; (7) "Using Rewards to Protect Endangered Species"; (8) "The Costs and Benefits of Having Children"; (9) "Why Are There So Few Whales and So Many Chickens?"; (10) "Why Do Nonrenewable Resources Keep Increasing?"; (11) "Can Insecticides Help Us Fight Cancer?"; (12) "Why Drive When You Can Ride?"; (13) "Will There Be Enough Food For You?"; (14) "Do We Make Too Much Stuff?"; (15) "Save the Babies"; (16) "Why Would People Cut Down Trees in a Public Park?"; (17) "The Mystery of the Disappearing Christmas Trees"; and (18) "What is Worth Recycling?" Descriptors: Capitalism, Conservation (Environment), Crowding, Ecology

Zeiss, Tony, Ed. (1989). Economic Development: A Viewpoint from Business. Keeping America Working/No. 6. Designed to broaden community college practitioners' awareness of the needs of business and related opportunities for cooperation, this book describes the training needs of large and small business of all types; discusses the opportunities for two-year colleges to assist businesses in satisfying those needs; and highlights the major interests of business and industry in the site selection process for expansions or relocations. Following introductory sections by Dale Parnell, Jack A. MacAllister, and Tony Zeiss, the following 14 chapters are presented: (1) "Roles of Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges: Positive Image Opportunity," by Tony Zeiss; (2) "Roles of Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges: Customized Training," by Cary Israel; (3) "Business Needs Survey Responses," by Tony Zeiss; (4) "Surviving the Tough Times," by James A. Smith; (5) "Developing a Small Business: Watersmith, Inc.," by Autie McVicker; (6) "Developing a Small Business: Little Chemical Company," by Jeanne Witbeck; (7) "Developing a Small Business: Overcoming the Risk Factors," by David A. King and Donald E. Kelly; (8) "Expanding a Business through Successful Employee Selection," by Jerry W. Moorman and R. B. Ruethain; (9) "Expanding a Business: Oceanarium Products and Design and Hunter Douglas, Inc.," by Mike Burns, Sue Secord, Mel G. Cozzens, and David Braman; (10) "Effective Expansion through Reduced Turnover of Employees," by Mitzi G. Cardenas and Jim Quintero; (11) "Site Selection Survey Responses," by Tony Zeiss; (12) "Selecting a Site," by Robert M. Ady; (13)"Industrial Recruitment Myths and Pitfalls," by Rolf Anderson; and (14) "Parting Conclusions," by Tony Zeiss. Descriptors: College Role, Community Colleges, Economic Change, Economic Climate

Wright, W. Alan; O'Neil, M. Carol (1994). Perspectives on Improving Teaching in Canadian Universities, Canadian Journal of Higher Education. A survey of instructional development practitioners at 51 Canadian universities investigated the perceived potential of 36 specific practices for improving teaching. Greatest potential was seen in faculty incentives (appointment, tenure, promotion). Administrator support of effective teaching was viewed as important, as were support structures providing faculty development opportunities.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Role, Change Strategies, College Faculty, College Instruction

Hargrove, David S. (1986). Rural Community Psychology and the Farm Foreclosure Crisis, Journal of Rural Community Psychology. Discusses socio-psychological effect of farm foreclosures and decline of agriculturally-related businesses in the midwest/plains states. Suggests that models for understanding human response to natural disasters are applicable to this crisis. Challenges the myth that rural people and communities bond together under stress and offers suggestions to rural mental health workers. Descriptors: Adjustment (to Environment), Agricultural Trends, Community Change, Community Psychology

Farmer, Donald W. (1993). Designing a Reward System to Promote the Career Development of Senior Faculty, New Directions for Teaching and Learning. King's College (Pennsylvania) has redesigned its faculty reward system, mixing intrinsic and extrinsic incentives in three interrelated institutional initiatives related to general educational reform, senior faculty performance appraisal, and merit pay. An early result of the effort is a perceptible improvement in faculty motivation and productivity. Descriptors: Age Differences, Career Development, Change Strategies, College Faculty

Zorfass, Judith; And Others (1989). Evaluation of the Integration of Technology for Instructing Handicapped Children (Middle School Level). Final Report of Phase I. This final report documents Phase I of a federally funded, naturalistic study of how middle schools can integrate technology into mainstream instruction for mildly handicapped students. Phase I of the study, carried out from October 1986 through September 1989, examined teacher practices that create successful, computer-supported learning experiences for special needs students, and examined the larger school and organizational context that sustains those teacher practices. A total of 23 administrators and 25 teachers from 4 middle schools participated in the 3-year study. Phase II will involve the development and field testing of a school-based intervention to enhance technology use. The report provides an overview of Phases I and II, a description of Phase I research methods and results, a model for a school-based approach to technology integration, and a description of the Phase II technical method. Sixteen study findings are organized into the categories of teacher knowledge and practice, technology resources, teacher development, collaboration and communication, and school-based facilitation. The technology integration model includes the following key elements: a technology integration facilitator, a technology support team, a trainer, teacher dyads, a module-based teacher development program, and school-based facilitation workshops. (Includes approximately 90 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Role, Computer Assisted Instruction, Context Effect, Demonstration Programs

Magruder, Jack; McManis, Michael A.; Young, Candace C. (1997). The Right Idea at the Right Time: Development of a Transformational Assessment Culture, New Directions for Higher Education. Assessment can have a profound transformational impact on a college or university, but for this to occur, such core values as improvement of student learning through collection of performance-related data must be integrated into the institutional culture. At Truman State University (Missouri), an initially modest commitment to improving student learning transformed the institution and influenced a national movement.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Standards, Case Studies, Change Strategies, College Outcomes Assessment

Reynolds, Charles F. III; And Others (1995). The Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Centralized versus Departmentalized, Academic Medicine. Central governance of undergraduate medical school curriculum is compared with traditional departmental approaches, based on experiences at the University of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania). It is argued that centralized governance has more advantages but greater cost. A major challenge of this approach is in resolution of faculty conflict between school and department, particularly in evaluation and reward of teaching. Descriptors: Articulation (Education), Centralization, Change Strategies, College Faculty

Cagan, Phillip; And Others (1973). A New Look at Inflation: Economic Policy in the Early 1970s. The volume, a sequel to "Economic Policy and Inflation in the Sixties" presents the diverse opinions of distinguished scholars on developments in the American economy since the institution of direct wage and price controls in August 1971. Gottfried Haberler considers the international aspects of recent United States inflation. William Fellner organizes his discussion of employment goals and overexpansion around manpower problems, acceleration and deceleration, "inflationary equilibrium," money supply targets, and unemployment. Phillip Cagan analyzes monetary policy and provides perspective on previous positive efforts to combat inflation under controls. Wage behavior during each of the control phases, as related to both average hourly earnings in the private nonfarm economy and negotiated wage settlement, is examined by Marten Estey. Charles McLure discusses fiscal policy by examining Kennedy-Johnson economics, the game plan of gradualism, Nixon's New Economic Policy, and the record of that policy.   [More]  Descriptors: Business Cycles, Change Strategies, Economic Change, Economic Climate

BOYD, ROBERT D. (1967). CHANGING CONCEPTS OF PRODUCTIVE LIVING. AT A CONFERENCE OF ADULT EDUCATORS DESIGNED TO BRING INTO FOCUS NEW PERSPECTIVES OF THE ROLES OF ADULT EDUCATION, PAPERS WERE PRESENTED ON THE CHANGING CONCEPTS OF PRODUCTIVE LIVING AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONCERN FOR PRODUCTIVE LIVING AND ADULT EDUCATION. AN OVERVIEW PROVIDED A WORKING ORIENTATION AND DESCRIBED THE BASIC FORCES AND PROBLEMS IN THE CHANGING ROLE AND CONCEPTUALIZATION OF WORK AND INDIVIDUAL PRODUCTIVITY. A SCHEMATIC MODEL WAS DEVELOPED OF THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY TO EXPLAIN THE EVOLUTIONARY, FEEDBACK, AND SYNTHESIS MECHANISMS OF INDIVIDUALS DYNAMICALLY INTERACTING IN SOCIETY. A PAPER DISCUSSES THE PROBLEM OF LEISURE IN MODERN SOCIETY. OUTDATED AND UNREALISTIC CONCEPTS OF COMMUNITY LIFE WERE IDENTIFIED AS FRUSTRATING AND BLOCKING PROGRESS TOWARD MORE PRODUCTIVE LIVING. THE PAPERS CONCLUDED WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE CHANGING SEX ROLES IN THE AMERICAN FAMILY AS REFLECTED IN VARYING NORMS FOR FAMILY LIVING, AND THE ROLE AND FUNCTION OF THE ADULT EDUCATOR IN RELATION TO THESE CHANGING CONCEPTS OF SEX ROLE DIFFERENTIATION. THIS DOCUMENT IS ALSO AVAILABLE FROM THE BOOKSTORE, UNIVERSITY EXTENSION, THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, 432 NORTH LAKE ST., MADISON, WISCONSIN 53706, FOR $2.50.   [More]  Descriptors: Automation, Community Change, Community Planning, Conferences

Austin, Ann E.; And Others (1991). The Academic Workplace Audit. This book is designed to accompany "A Good Place to Work: Sourcebook for the Academic Workplace" and represents a tool for colleges interested in supporting faculty morale and the quality of the academic workplace. The Audit, developed from a study by the Council of Independent Colleges, is organized into nine sections, each one focusing on an important organizational factor. The first four sections deal with organizational factors of primary importance in regard to faculty morale and cover organizational culture, leadership, organizational promise and momentum, and institutional identification coupled with institutional diversity. The subsequent five sections address important issues pertaining to the quality of the academic workplace and the level of faculty morale including support for scholarship, faculty development, balance of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, the nature of colleagueship, and college-community relations. Each section of the Audit begins with a brief statement defining the particular organizational factor and providing the study findings. This statement is followed by a list of questions useful for stimulating and guiding discussion and examination of the organizational factor. Finally, each section ends with several open-ended statements to help focus ideas that emerge from use of the Audit questions.   [More]  Descriptors: Change Strategies, College Faculty, Colleges, Faculty Development

Gill, Indermit S., Ed.; Fluitman, Fred, Ed.; Dar, Amit, Ed. (2000). Vocational Education and Training Reform: Matching Skills to Markets and Budgets. This book contains 19 papers from a study of vocational education and training (VET) in 19 countries with different economic situations (transition economies, high-growth economies, low-growth economies). The papers focus on the following issues addressed in the study: (1) the countries' experiences in reforming national VET policies; (2) obstacles faced by the study countries as they attempted to implement VET policy adjustments in response to changing labor markets; and (3) innovative approaches to overcoming the identified obstacles in the various countries. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Indermit S. Gill, Amit Dar, Fred Fluitman); "Hungary" (Martin Godfrey); "Poland" (Peter Grootings); "Czech Republic" (Peter Grootings); "Russian Federation" (Richard Johanson); "Kazakhstan" (Alan Abrahart); "China" (Peter R. Fallon, Gordon Hunting); "Indonesia" (Zafiris Tzannatos, Haneen Sayed); "Malaysia" (Hong W. Tan, Indermit S. Gill); "Republic of Korea" (Indermit S. Gill, Chon-Sun Ihm); "Chile" (Alejandra Cox Edwards); "Mexico" (Mari Minowa); "South Africa" (Adrian Ziderman, Arvil Van Adams); "Tanzania" (Amit Dar); "Zambia" (Fred Fluitman, Wim Alberts); "Arab Republic of Egypt" (Indermit S. Gill, Stephen P. Heyneman); "Jordan" (Zafiris Tzannatos, Victor Billeh); "West Bank and Gaza Strip" (Fred Fluitman); "Australia" (Alan Abrahart, Zafiris Tzannatos); and "Germany" (Indermit S. Gill, Amat Dar). One hundred sixty tables/figures/boxes are included. Some papers contain substantial bibliographies. Descriptors: Accreditation (Institutions), Apprenticeships, Budgets, Change Strategies

Donahue, John D.; Lynch, Lisa M.; Whitehead, Ralph, Jr. (2000). Opportunity Knocks: Training the Commonwealth's Workers for the New Economy. The current situation regarding training Massachusetts' workers for the new economy was reviewed. Special attention was paid to the following topics: Massachusetts and the skill-centered economy; opportunities for workforce system reform; skills demanded in the new economy; ways other states are building workers' skills; and the fragile setting for system building. Among the review's main findings were the following: (1) the income gap between high-end professional/technical workers and less-skilled workers is increasing; (2) businesses' competitive advantages are eroding because critical positions are going unfilled; (3) the current boom cannot be sustained without adequate supplies of skilled labor; and (4) Massachusetts's weak suit (compared with that of other states) is providing skill-building opportunities for lower-middle-class and working-class adults. The following seven recommendations for improving the state's work force development system were formulated: (1) focus on measurable performance outcomes, and hold elements of the system accountable for results; (2) encourage business and labor support, and invite business and labor pressure; (3) build the nation's best work force information system; (4) build a work force development system that provides training opportunities to a broad spectrum of workers, not just the unemployed; (5) take consolidation and customer choice seriously but gradually; (6) fund the workforce development system at a level that reflects its growing importance to the state's shared prosperity; and (7) Provide the bipartisan leadership vital to the effort's success. (Includes 13 tables and figures.) Descriptors: Adult Education, College Graduates, Comparative Analysis, Delivery Systems

Miller, Carolyn; Ross, Nick; Freeman, Marnie (1999). Shared Learning and Clinical Teamwork: New Directions in Education for Multiprofessional Practice. Researching Professional Education Research Report Series. The role of collaborative/shared learning in nursing, midwifery, and visiting nurse education in the United Kingdom was explored to identify the qualities and skills needed by practitioners to work effectively in multiprofessional contexts and establish the fit between the knowledge and skills needed in multiprofessional practice and the teaching and learning occurring in educational preparation. The main data collection activities were as follows: (1) in-depth case studies of 6 multiprofessional teams in different clinical settings; (2) a survey of all U.K. higher education institutions running or planning initial or continuing education courses for health and social care professionals; (3) interviews with 14 trust managers; and (4) interviews with representatives of a sample of professional bodies. The study established a lack of congruence between the knowledge needed to function effectively in multiprofessional teams and most current education provision. A critical need for new models of shared learning was identified. An example model based on the clinical case study material was presented. The following were among the model's key elements: (1) incremental development of communication, teamwork, and other key skills; (2) content that is clinically relevant, patient-focused, and case/scenario based; and (3) emphasis on interaction and problem solving. (Contains 20 tables/figures and 120 references.) Descriptors: Allied Health Occupations Education, Allied Health Personnel, Case Studies, Change Strategies

Bond, Meg A.; Pyle, Jean L. (1994). Workforce Diversity: Status, Controversies, and an Interdisciplinary Approach. Labor force participation rates, pay inequities, occupational segregation, positions in the hierarchy, interactions between diverse groups, and organizational culture all demonstrate that diversity in the workplace has not been fully achieved. Existing approaches to supporting workplace diversity have not worked, and, in many cases, have resulted in new sets of problems or dilemmas. For example, the equal employment opportunity approach, although effective in increasing participation, has engendered a strong racial and gender backlash. Corporate efforts to increase sensitivity through inhouse programs have often aroused animosity rather than defusing it. Family-friendly policies offered by many organizations are often not widely used because women who use them are perceived as less serious employees. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new perspective on how to incorporate diverse groups successfully. A new, more workable approach should be drawn from multiple disciplines–economics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, business, and law. A multilevel analysis must be developed that includes attention to individual, work group, organization, and societal factors. It is necessary to understand a variety of complex and relatively unanticipated problems: contradictions between intent and impact, resistance and backlash, and limited impact on organizational cultures. The goal is to reduce institutional and attitudinal barriers to diverse groups working together and to empower individuals and groups within a more favorable environment. (Contains 151 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Attitude Change, Corporate Education, Cultural Differences, Diversity (Institutional)

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